Upcoming Events

February 2018

February 2, 2018 | 2 p.m.

Webinar: Free Active Shooter Training for Museums

Laura Casey

This training program, led by Sergeant Michael Monaghan of the Texas Department of Public Safety, is designed to teach you, as a museum staff, volunteer or board member, to take direct responsibility for your personal safety and security in the museum and beyond. It stresses awareness, preparation, and rehearsal; the keys to safety. You will learn how, with proper mindset and the necessary tools, to be better equipped to react with purpose and to maximize your chance of survival if involved in an active shooter situation. Free but you must register

February 6, 2018 | 6:30 PM

Opening Reception for Clearing Stones Sowing Seeds Photo Exhibit

Austin History Center

The Austin History Center invites you to the opening of its newest exhibit “Clearing Stones and Sowing Seeds: Photographs from the Travis County Negro Extension Service” on February 6 at 6:30 pm. The exhibit presents selections from the Travis County Negro Extension Service Photography Collection (AR.2000.025) archived at the History Center. The photographs, taken between 1940 and 1964, document the variety of services and educational programs offered by the Extension Service, including animal husbandry, crafts, domestic education, gardening and agriculture, and home improvement. The opening reception will feature a Pie Social. The event is free and open to the public.

February 7, 2018 | 5 PM

A Chat about Things: Artist Talk with Emily Lee and Rachael Henson

Visual Arts Center

Join us for an intimate discussion with the artists from Almost Doesn’t Count. Visitors are welcome to sit on the floor along with the artists on provided pillows and blankets. About Almost Doesn't Count Relatability, alienation, and the desire to categorize the individual body frames the conversation of Almost Doesn’t Count. Drawing from both their Asian and white backgrounds, Rachel Henson and Emily Lee explore the endless in-between-ness of identifying oneself. About the Artists Emily Lee is a junior earning a BFA in Studio Art, a BA in Art History, and a BDP certificate in Museum Studies. Her work considers the distinction between objects / humans and explores intimacy, hierarchy and functionality through sculpture, performance and video. She has previously studied at the Marchutz School of Fine Arts and Penland School of Crafts. Rachael Henson is currently in the process of completing her senior year in the College of Fine Arts to receive her BFA in Studio Art. She is a recipient of the Dallas Endowed Presidential Scholarship in Art. Her work primarily deals with representing the body as it pertains to memory, connecting the tangible and intangible.

February 9, 2018 | 3 PM

Untitled Opening Reception

Visual Arts Center

Join us for the opening reception of Untitled, an exhibition from the Undergraduate Art History Association exploring the relationship between contemporary art and the theory of the past. About Untitled Students of art are inexorably tied to the past. For better or for worse, the work we create is viewed through the lens of the artists before us. The Undergraduate Art History Association presents Untitled, an exhibition exploring the relationship between contemporary art and the theory of the past. This exhibition is organized by Professor Janice Leoshko and the Undergraduate Art History Association. The Undergraduate Art History Association (UAHA) is a student organization officially sponsored by the College of Fine Arts, whose purposes are to promote the visual arts and to advance the career and educational opportunities of its members, during and beyond their time at college. Its primary function is to establish a dialogue between UAHA members and the Art History and Studio Art divisions of the department. From time to time, the Association also plans bus trips to major exhibitions in Texas museums. Artists Erin Branscum Sasha Fishman Shelby Flowers Tanya Gantiva Kaelyn Jade Huang Brooke Johnson Clay Kogut Logan Larsen Jade Partain Rachel Tyler Curators Keya Patel Mackenzie Nissen Nick Purgett Minsu Kwon

February 10, 2018 | 11:00 AM

TalkAbout: Printmaking & Technology

Women & Their Work

By exploring and examining new forms of printmaking using circuiting and thermochromic pigments, artist Evelyn Contreras and Hiba Ali will discuss how technology has influenced printmaking and has created a multidisciplinary art form. Basic circuiting enhances print presentation through movement and light by utilizing LED diodes and DC motors. Thermo-chromic prints change in color based on temperature interventions. TalkAbout is a new program that facilitates casual Saturday morning conversations with artists and the people who inspire them. This event is free and open to the public. Coffee, mimosas, and breakfast snacks provided!

February 13, 2018 | 11:15 AM

Painting Sacred Time: An Artists’ Guide to The Codex Borgia

Visual Arts Center

The Codex Borgia is more than an ancient Aztec manuscript. It’s a work of art — one that was painstakingly reproduced over the course of twenty years by an eccentric artist from Texas. Join Elliot López-Finn​, Ph.D. candidate in Art History, in taking a deeper look at the intricate visual details and iconographic elements of The Codex Borgia in this informal talk geared toward art students and art enthusiasts alike. About the Codex Borgia: Seen as proof of idolatry and subsequently burned by the Spanish, most pre-Hispanic Aztec painted manuscripts did not survive the Conquest period. As one of the few surviving examples of indigenous books of beliefs and ceremonies, The Codex Borgia is an invaluable resource to understand the ancient Americas. Once owned by and named after the Cardinal Borgia of Renaissance Italy, the original manuscript is now kept in the Vatican Library. The hand-painted reproduction on artisan-made bark paper presented at the Visual Arts Center is the result of a decades-long project by artist Richard Lee Gutherie with Gisele Diaz and Alan Rodgers. The original manuscript, inaccessible for many years until recent digitization, is known to most scholars and Mesoamerican enthusiasts through a 1993 Dover edition reproduction by the same team. These never-before-exhibited folios, all 76 pages of The Codex Borgia, debut at the Visual Art Center in conjunction with the UT Austin Mesoamerica Meetings conference.

February 14, 2018 | 10:00am

Homeschool Day at the Science Mill: Engineering

Science Mill

This Valentine's Day, fall in love with engineering at the Science Mill's February Homeschool Day. Join real engineers and discover how math and science come together in an engineering design process that creates everything from buildings and bridges to the electronics that power your cell phone! Plus, students can attend optional age-based Learning Labs and explore the museum’s 50+ unique exhibits and 3D movie.   Contact: info@sciencemill.org Cost: $6 per student. 1 free educator per student. Additional adults are $10. No reservations required. Hours: 10 am - 4 pm

February 15, 2018 | 12:00 pm

Spanish-Language Gallery Tour of The Codex Borgia

Visual Arts Center

Dive deeper into The Codex Borgia exhibition with an introduction to the culture of the ancient Americas and the various iconographic elements of the codex in this tour led by Ph.D. candidates in Art History Catherine Nuckols and Josefrayn Sánchez-Perry. About The Codex Borgia Seen as proof of idolatry and subsequently burned by the Spanish, most pre-Hispanic Aztec painted manuscripts did not survive the Conquest period. As one of the few surviving examples of indigenous books of beliefs and ceremonies, The Codex Borgia is an invaluable resource to understand the ancient Americas. Once owned by and named after the Cardinal Borgia of Renaissance Italy, the original manuscript is now kept in the Vatican Library. The hand-painted reproduction on artisan-made bark paper presented at the Visual Arts Center is the result of a decades-long project by artist Richard Lee Gutherie with Gisele Diaz and Alan Rodgers. The original manuscript, inaccessible for many years until recent digitization, is known to most scholars and Mesoamerican enthusiasts through a 1993 Dover edition reproduction by the same team. These never-before-exhibited folios, all 76 pages of The Codex Borgia, debut at the Visual Art Center in conjunction with the UT Austin Mesoamerica Meetings conference.

February 15, 2018 | 4:00 pm

Artist Talk: Caitlin Halloran

Visual Arts Center

Halloran’s work uses associative color and serious play to mimic objectivity and hysteria. Her recent textiles and drawings toy with the viewer’s expectations of rationality and narrative by engaging a feminist form of comic one-liners. Through these material and textual jokes, Halloran’s humor creates a visual world that is as colorful and messy as our own hilarious lives in all their weird particulars. Caitlin Halloran (link is external) received her BFA from The University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2014 and her MFA from The University of Texas at Austin in 2017. Her work has been shown at the Visual Arts Center (Austin), MASS Gallery (Austin), The Wurks (Providence, RI) and the Augusta Savage Gallery (Amherst, MA), among other venues. She lives and works in New York. Presented in conjunction with Halloran’s exhibition Queen Size, on view at the Courtyard Gallery February 15 – April 21, 2018. A reception with the artist at the gallery will immediately follow the artist talk.

February 15, 2018 | 5:00 PM

Opening Reception for Caitlin Halloran’s Queen Size

Visual Arts Center

Caitlin Halloran: Queen Size February 15 – April 21, 2018 Artist Talk Thursday, February 15 4–5 p.m. Art Building, Room 1.120 Reception Thursday, February 15 5–7 p.m. Courtyard Gallery Halloran’s work uses associative color and serious play to mimic objectivity and hysteria. Her recent textiles and drawings toy with the viewer’s expectations of rationality and narrative by engaging a feminist form of comic one-liners. Through these material and textual jokes, Halloran’s humor creates a visual world that is as colorful and messy as our own hilarious lives in all their weird particulars. Caitlin Halloran received her BFA from The University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2014 and her MFA from The University of Texas at Austin in 2017. Her work has been shown at the Visual Arts Center (Austin), MASS Gallery (Austin), The Wurks (Providence, RI) and the Augusta Savage Gallery (Amherst, MA), among other venues. She lives and works in New York.