Harry Ransom Center

The Harry Ransom Center is an internationally renowned humanities research library and museum. Its extensive holdings provide a unique record of the creative process of writers and artists, deepening our understanding of literature, photography, film, art, and the performing arts. Thousands of scholars, students, and cultural enthusiasts from around the world study materials from the collections each year. These collections also inspire original exhibitions and programs that offer visitors opportunity for enrichment, discovery, and delight. The Ransom Center advances the study of the arts and humanities and fosters an environment where culture thrives.

TOURS
Noon Daily
6 p.m. Thursday
2 p.m. Saturday
2 p.m. Sunday

View upcoming tour schedule.

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location

21st and Guadalupe streets (map)

hours

10 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday; 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Thursday; Noon–5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

admissions

Admission is free. Your donation supports the Ransom Center's exhibitions and public programs.

phone

(512) 471-8944

website

www.hrc.utexas.edu

upcoming events

February 21, 2018 | 4:30 PM

Early Digital Facsimiles

Increasingly, libraries provide access to their special collections beyond the physical walls of reading rooms in the form of photographic facsimiles hosted online. There are clear benefits to this kind of expanded access, but digitization can never be perfectly neutral: photographs and scans can only ever serve as partial representations of physical objects, and decisions have to be made about what gets digitized in the first place. In her lecture, “Early Digital Facsimiles,” Sarah Werner will discuss the rise of digitization and its impact on the study of early modern books. Werner, who previously served as Digital Media Strategist at the Folger Shakespeare Library, is the author of the forthcoming "Studying Early Printed Books, 1450–1800: A Practical Guide."

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March 8, 2018 | 7:00 PM

Vaudeville: Immigrants Get the Job Done

Professors Charlotte Canning and Andrew Carlson present “Vaudeville: Immigrants Get the Job Done,” an examination of the vaudeville stage as a site for the development of American cultural and social norms through performances both by and about the country's immigrant populations. The program looks closely at a few of the genre's popular stars and routines in order to explain how, when it came to early twentieth-century vaudeville, immigrants were working hard to “get the job done”—both onstage and off. The evening brings the archive to life through live performance of iconic vaudevillian sketches and routines to supplement an engaging discussion led by Dr. Canning. This program complements our exhibition "Vaudeville!"

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March 21, 2018 | 7:00 PM

Vaudeville! Exhibition Tour

Join the Ransom Center’s Cline Curator of Theatre and Performing Arts Eric Colleary for an inside look at the exhibition Vaudeville!

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April 10, 2018 | 6 PM

Lecture by Nate DiMeo, Creator of The Memory Palace Podcast

Nate DiMeo, creator of the historical story-telling podcast The Memory Palace and 2016-2017 Artist in Residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, discusses his methods of research, the production of his podcast, and the role of public scholarship in the American media landscape. Organized by the Department of American Studies. For more information please visit http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/events/

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April 17, 2018 | 4:30PM

Discussion of Visual Representations of Race and Ethnicity

In conjunction with the exhibition "Vaudeville!," Chair of the American Studies Department and Ransom Center Faculty Curator Steven Hoelscher leads a conversation about visual representations of race and ethnicity from the late nineteenth century to the present. Panelists include Jacqueline Jones, Professor and Chair, Department of History; Leonard N. Moore, Professor, Department of History and Vice President of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (Interim); and Shirley E. Thompson, Associate Professor, Department of American Studies and Department of African and African Diaspora Studies.

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