Harry Ransom Center

The Harry Ransom Center is an internationally renowned humanities research library and museum. Its extensive holdings provide a unique record of the creative process of writers and artists, deepening our understanding of literature, photography, film, art, and the performing arts. Thousands of scholars, students, and cultural enthusiasts from around the world study materials from the collections each year. These collections also inspire original exhibitions and programs that offer visitors opportunity for enrichment, discovery, and delight. The Ransom Center advances the study of the arts and humanities and fosters an environment where culture thrives.

TOURS
Noon Daily
6 p.m. Thursday
2 p.m. Saturday
2 p.m. Sunday

View upcoming tour schedule.

Book a group tour.

location

21st and Guadalupe streets (map)

hours

10 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday; 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Thursday; Noon–5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

admissions

Admission is free. Your donation supports the Ransom Center's exhibitions and public programs.

phone

(512) 471-8944

website

www.hrc.utexas.edu

upcoming events

March 21, 2019 | 7:00pm

Poetry and War: A Reading and Conversation

Commemorate World Poetry Day with a reading and conversation between two award-winning poets whose lives and writings have been impacted by war. Dunya Mikhail was forced to flee Iraq in the wake of the first Gulf War. She is the author of "The Iraqi Nights" (2014), "The War Works Hard" (2005), and "The Beekeeper: Rescuing the Stolen Women of Iraq" (2018), which was longlisted for the 2018 National Book Award for Literature in Translation. Brian Turner served in the US Army with deployments in Iraq and Bosnia-Herzegovina. He is the author of two poetry collections, "Here, Bullet" (2005) and "Phantom Noise" (2010), and his memoir, "My Life and a Foreign Country," was published in 2014.

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March 27, 2019 | 07:00 PM

What can a woman do? Women in the Arts and Crafts Movement

What was the role of women designers in the Anglo/American Arts and Crafts movement? Wendy Kaplan, curator of Decorative Arts and Design at the LACMA Los Angeles County Museum of Art, will focus on women's leadership in social and economic reform, as well as the restrictions on full participation. While we consider education and career choices to be fundamental rights for women just over a hundred years ago, these were mostly utopian dreams. Discover how social reformers, advocates of women's rights, and followers of the Arts and Crafts movement addressed the question of work for women designers and craftspeople toward the end of the nineteenth century. Free and open to the public. Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater seats 125. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

April 4, 2019 | 6:30PM

Joyce Maynard

In the Flair symposium's keynote, New York Times bestselling writer Joyce Maynard will reflect on her correspondence, at age 18, with J.D. Salinger, its consequences, what happened to those letters 25 years later, and what we can learn from the story in the age of the Me Too movement. The keynote address is open to the public; registrants of the Flair Symposium, Ethical Challenges in Cultural Stewardship will have reserved seating.

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April 11, 2019 | 06:30 PM

Rachel Cusk

The publication of "Kudos" in 2018 completed Rachel Cusk's critically acclaimed literary trilogy that began with "Outline" (2014) and "Transit" (2016). Cusk will be reading from "Kudos," a book The New Yorker called "a breathtaking success." Free and open to the public. Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater seats 125. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

May 16, 2019 | 7:00pm

Composite Landscapes: Early Film Special Effects

Film historian Leslie DeLassus examines early film special effects innovator Norman O. Dawn and his groundbreaking work, including the pioneering "glass shot." His productions of one-reel travel films starting in 1907 featuring exotic and scenic elements of remote locations were reworked using glass-shot and matte-shot processes, and appeared in 85 feature-length films for which Dawn produced effects. Learn more about his techniques during the lecture, and visit the Stories to Tellexhibition during gallery hours to see a display of collages Dawn made during his career.

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