Austin History Center

As the local history collection of the Austin Public Library, the Austin History Center provides the public with information about the history, current events, and activities of Austin and Travis County. We collect and preserve information about local governments, businesses, residents, institutions, and neighborhoods so that generations to come will have access to our history.

Our expert staff is ready to assist researchers in our Reading Room six days a week, Tuesday-Sunday. On Mondays our staff and volunteers process archival materials for use by the public. Our exhibits program offers 4 exhibits a year on various Austin topics in the Grand Lobby and the David Earl Holt Photo Gallery.

We have two exhibits currently on display:

Play Ball! Austin and the Great American Pastime

Finding Refuge in Austin, 1848-1980.

For more information about our exhibits, upcoming programs, and other services, visit us online at www.austinhistorycenter.org

location

810 Guadalupe St. (map)

hours

Tuesday - Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM, Sunday 12 noon to 6 PM, CLOSED Mondays

admissions

FREE

phone

512-974-7480

website

library.austintexas.gov/ahc

upcoming events

May 9, 2017 | 6:30 PM

Meet the Authors: Eddie Wilson and Jesse Sublett

The Austin History Center invites you to an evening book discussion with Eddie Wilson, who recently published his memoirs Armadillo World Headquarters: A Memoir. Wilson will be joined by Jesse Sublett, who assisted with the book. They will discuss the book and how the project came together as well as share stories of the legendary Austin music venue. A book signing will follow the presentation and light refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public. About the book: In this rollicking memoir, Eddie Wilson tells the behind-the-scenes story of the Armadillo from the moment he first peered into a derelict National Guard armory building and knew that destiny had found him. He vividly describes how two previously clashing groups—rednecks and hippies—came together at the Armadillo, enjoying a new blend of country music and rock that spawned a many-named movement: cosmic cowboy, progressive country, and redneck rock, among others.